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John Williams gives a disruptive economic forecast

Goldseek Radio, Released on 9/4/19

  • John Williams of Shadowstats.com returns to the show with a disruptive economic forecast.
  • Shadowstats.com’s analysis mirrors the work of Boston University Economist, Professor Kotlikoff.
  • The nation may be facing a solvency crisis if long-term obligations continue to accumulate.
  • John Williams finds that up to $80 trillion is required to keep the house-of-cards from imploding.
  • The system is flooded with $20 trillion in US Treasury debt.
  • John Williams notes the lack of interest in lower debt levels in Washington.
  • Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan’s noted the US could face default if the debts remain at lofty levels.
  • The duo concur “perpetual quantitative easing,” is likely making gold and PMs assets the ideal panacea.
  • The dialogue veers to conjecture over the fate of the US Fed.
  • Conjecture mounts over if the Administration plans to restore the Constitutionally prescribed gold money.
  • The host coins the term, Fexit, i.e., exiting the Fed system.
  • Such a drastic shift to a sound-money economy requires a gradual shift over many years.
  • Time is required for to adjust to the former highly prosperous monetary system.
  • Shadowstats and Goldseek.com agree, directing even a modicum of income to the PMs sector remains the best panacea for the inflationary specter lurking within the global economy.

Walter J. “John” Williams has been a private consulting economist and a specialist in government economic reporting for more than 30 years. His economic consultancy is called Shadow Government Statistics (shadowstats.com). His early work in economic reporting led to front-page stories in The New York Times and Investor’s Business Daily. He received a bachelor’s degree in economics, cum laude, from Dartmouth College in 1971, and was awarded a master’s degree in business administration from Dartmouth’s Amos Tuck School of Business Administration in 1972, where he was named an Edward Tuck Scholar.

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