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John Williams: The 2008 market collapse/Great Recession never ended

Chris Waltzek, Goldseek Radio, Released on 2/7/17

Highlights:

  • Rogue economist, John Williams of Shadowstats.com says the US dollar rally is a fata morgana, a rate hike bluff by Fed policymakers.
  • The 2008 market collapse / Great Recession never ended; the Treasury / Fed merely sidestepped financial calamity at an enormous cost.
  • Ultimately, the FOMC will be coerced by market forces, resulting in lower rates and sizable balance sheets via toxic debt purchases.
  • Unbeknownst to most citizens, the US Fed’s is a private protective unit for the banking / financial elite.
  • Ever since 1932, whenever the growth of real disposable income “takeoff pay” is below 3 percent, the incumbent Presidential candidate always wins.
  • While our guest has high hopes for the new Administration, the 12 month lead time between stimulus and actual results could disappoint the typical American.
  • Our guest expects the Greenback to continue decent to lower lows, resulting in hyperinflation.
  • Only gold / silver investments will thrive under the end game he outlines; every household accumulate several months of canned items and ample cash / PMs.
  • Similar to the New Madrid earthquake stunned the Midwest by reversing the flow of the Mississippi, the next financial crisis will offer little warning time.
  • The new Administration could right the economic titanic in part by reviving the 40 page Glass-Stegall act to heal the financial system.

Walter J. “John” Williams has been a private consulting economist and a specialist in government economic reporting for more than 30 years. His economic consultancy is called Shadow Government Statistics (shadowstats.com). His early work in economic reporting led to front-page stories in The New York Times and Investor’s Business Daily. He received a bachelor’s degree in economics, cum laude, from Dartmouth College in 1971, and was awarded a master’s degree in business administration from Dartmouth’s Amos Tuck School of Business Administration in 1972, where he was named an Edward Tuck Scholar.

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